National 5 and Higher Tutor in East Renfrewshire

At Scholar Tutoring, we have a professional team of teacher that are ready to provide the following services to East Renfrewshire, we are a local tutoring company and we cover Giffnock, Whitecraigs, Newton Mearns and other south side of Glasgow locations.. One to One Tutoring Revision courses Newton Mearns Christmas Revision Course With the prestigious St Ninian’s High School located within Giffnock, East Renfrewshire as well as other well performing schools competition in school placements can be fierce. Good results at primary school can be the difference between achieving the placement that can open doors later in life, or missing out on their first choice school. Tuition can help to prepare students for the academic rigors of attending one of the country’s top performing schools, or help them to achieve the same level of academic excellence no matter the school they attend. Once at high school we can provide regular weekly sessions as well as Newton Mearns intensive study sessions during the Christmas and Easter holidays. Being an affluent area students can find that peer pressure to perform can be fierce, and upsetting. Often class mates and peers may have assistance outside the class room, and this can leave students feeling at a distinct disadvantage. Contact us now so we can discuss your exact requirements to assist your child whether in the short, medium or long term. Click here to see some of the subjects that we offer in the south of Glasgow

See Full Article Here: National 5 and Higher Tutor in East Renfrewshire

How to Add Google Drive to Microsoft Word

You can use Google AND Microsoft Together

How to use google Drive and Microsoft Office Together

You can add Google Drive to Microsoft Office now. It can save you time, particularly if you’re saving files in Office formats inside Google Drive. I’ve tested the setup. Here’s a screencast to get started. Set up is quick, three steps in about two minutes. There are a few issues to know before you start using it, though.

How to Add Google Drive to Microsoft Word (and Microsoft Office)

The video above includes these steps.

STEP 1: Close Microsoft Office. (It cannot be running to do this.)

STEP 2:  Download the Google Drive Plugin For Office

Click here to download the Google Drive Plugin for Office. This plugin is only available for Microsoft Windows Computers. (Sorry Mac.)

STEP 3: Open Microsoft Office

It will have you enter your credentials for Google.

How to Open, Save, and Use Files Between Microsoft Word and Google Drive

Here’s where it gets a bit tricky, so I’m splitting this up for you into four ways you can use the files together.

TIP: Here, we’re pretty much using Google Drive and Google Docs interchangeably, but there is a difference. Google Docs is the word processor for Google. So, Microsoft Word works with Google Docs. Microsoft Excel works with Google Sheets. Microsoft PowerPoint works with Google Slides. Google Docs, Sheets, and Slides are all part of Google Drive just like Microsoft Word, Excel and Powerpoint are part of Microsoft Office.

A. Opening Files from Google Drive

  • In Microsoft Word, you click “open files.”
  • Then, when you click “Open from Google Drive,” you’ll see your Google Drive.
  • Google Drive files will look like a small blue square. Microsoft Word files will have the blue W.
  • If you open a Google Doc file, it will open on the Web in Google Drive.

B. Opening a Google Doc file into Google Drive

  • When it opens the file, just go to File –> Download As –> Microsoft Word (.docx).
  • Then, you’ll just open into Microsoft Word (If you’re using Google Chrome, just click the file at the bottom.)
  • When you open the file, you’ll want to click “enable editing” so you can work with the file.

C. The Google Drive Ribbon in Microsoft Word

After installing the plugin, in the 2013/2016 versions of Microsoft Office, Google Drive now has a ribbon.

Add Google Drive to Microsoft Office

The new Google Drive ribbon in Office after the plugin is installed.

In the video, I go over each of the buttons.

  • Save to Drive lets you save into Google Drive. It will be saved as a Word file. The sharing settings for the folder you save it into will apply to any new documents you save, so pay attention to where you’re saving your files!
  • You can Open from the ribbon.
  • Share. You can change sharing settings from the ribbon. (If you’re a school, it will pull up all the emails of others using Google Apps for education.)
  • Save As. You can save it as another name.
  • Rename. Just rename the file.
  • Move. Move the file to somewhere else in your Google Drive.
  • Settings. This powerful tool will help some of you. You can tell the ribbon only to show Microsoft Word files or to show Word and Google Doc files. This way, if you just want to use Microsoft Word files, you can set it up this way. (It may prevent confusion for some beginners at your school.)
TIP. Remember that if you’re saving in Google Drive, the file is NOT on your computer. It is in Google Drive. So, if you don’t have Internet access, you can’t open the file.

D. Google Drive and Microsoft Word Files

When you open the Microsoft Word files in Google Drive, remember that you just have two options: View Only and Edit as Google Docs.

  • View Only. You can only view the file, you cannot edit it.
  • Edit as Google Docs. This button makes a COPY of your file. You’re now editing this as a Google Doc file.

WORKFLOW TIPS

  • Add something on the end of your files until you get the hang of the two programs working together.
  • Practice moving files around.
  • You might want to add a folder for your Word files to separate them from your Google Drive files.
  • Be careful about sharing. When you share to a folder, it shares it with everyone who has access to that folder. Make sure beginners understand this.
What are your tips? Please share your tips and tutorials with the rest of us since this is very new. Leave a comment or ask your question below. How are you using Google Drive and Microsoft Word together? 

The post How to Add Google Drive to Microsoft Word appeared first on Cool Cat Teacher Blog by Vicki Davis @coolcatteacher helping educators be excellent every day. Meow!

Learning Beyond The Curriculum

danzen-fiLearning Beyond The Curriculum

by Stewart Hase and Chris Kenyon

Ed note: This is part 2 in a series on self-determined learning from Stewart Hase and Chris Kenyon. Stewart’s site, Heutagogy Community of Practice, is a useful resource for reading on Self-Determined Learning. The first post was Shifting From Pedagogy to Heutagogy In Education.

The science of learning, discovering how people learn, as opposed to the philosophy of learning and education that goes back to Egyptian times, can be sheeted back to around the tenth-century. However, it is only recently that advances in neuroscience and the capacity to investigate the functioning of the brain have really enabled us to see what happens when we learn. In the past ten years our understanding has risen exponentially.

Commonly used definitions of learning have failed to keep pace with these advances in neuroscience and appear to be rather outmoded (Hase, 2010). Learning is often referred to as knowledge being gained through study, instruction or scholarship or the act of gaining knowledge. Many accepted psychological definitions refer to learning as being the result of any change in behaviour that results from experience. Discussions about learning mostly concern the education process rather than what happens in the brain of the learner – where learning really takes place.

It’s important to establish at this point that we are not attempting a neurological reductionist explanation of learning. Clearly learning is a complex interaction of myriad influences including genes, neurophysiology, physical state, social experience and psychological factors.

However, we suggest that understanding what is happening in the brain when we learn might provide important new insights into what is happening to the learner in the education or training experience. When we learn something, networks of neurons are established that can later be accessed, what we call memory (e.g. Benfenati, 2007). Laying down larger and larger numbers of pathways creates an increasingly complex matrix (Willis, 2006). Thus, old and new pathways influence each other in potentially quite dramatic ways through a process of activation and association (Khaneman, 2011). It appears that humans seek to make patterns from their experience.

Furthermore, it is hard to predict just what the effect of this pattern making from the mix of new and old learning might be. We might be aiming for a simple change in behaviour, a new competency perhaps. But the learner may end up making a whole bunch of cognitive leaps and end up seeing the world in completely different ways: ways not necessarily defined by the curriculum, which now becomes a constraint. Thus, every brain is different. Our experiences mean that each person will selectively focus on different issues, concerns and applications of the things they are learning. They will be asking different questions in their minds, testing their own hypotheses, making their own conclusions as a result.

John Medina in ‘Brain Rules’ (2008a) gives a great example of the neuroscience underpinning the above assertion. The part of the cerebral cortex for the use of the fingers of the left hand in a right-handed violinist is extremely dense with cells. Presumably this is the result of practice. People who do not play the violin do not have this density in the same place but presumably have denser areas elsewhere depending on what their areas of interest might be.

So, the response of the individual to new information, to new experiences will vary a great deal due to this unconscious selection. In fact, it may take years before a person has that ‘ah, ah’, moment. This all questions the fixed curriculum, didactic teaching, teacher-directed learning and many of the methods we currently use. The notion of brain plasticity recently popularized by Doidge (2007) also provides some fascinating insights into how people learn.

More importantly these insights have led to the development of highly focused techniques being used to target very specific areas of the brain. Neuroscience research shows that the more we actually ‘do’ with a new piece of learning the greater the number of neuronal pathways that are established and cemented in place through the development of matrices of dendrites mediated by the release of neurotrophins (Willis, 2006). This supports previous well-known evidence that an enriched environment leads to increased development of the brain (Rosenzweig et al., 1962) and this finding is used in a number of educational contexts.

Exploration is far more effective for learning than using rote methods or passive processes. It is also interesting that the more satisfying, engaging and perhaps exciting the education process, the more internally reinforcing it is to the learner through the release of dopamine (Willis, 2006). There are parts of the brain that are responsible for watching others, forming hypothoses, testing assumptions and generally exploring (Gopnik et al., 2000). These skills and the relevant brain activity is seen in children – they are great learners. Repetition using different senses, application and providing context or at least finding out what the learner’s context might be are critical to learning. In fact the more elaborately we experience something, the more likely we are to learn it (Craik and Tulving, 1975; Gabrielli et al., 1996; Grant et al., 1998; Hasher and Zacks, 1984; LeDoux, 2002; Medina, 2008b).

The converse is also true. The human attention span has been shown to be limited to about ten minutes when stimulation is low and there is an absence of activity (Johnstone and Percival, 1976; Middendorf and Kalish, 1996). Humans are built to be active, to do things, to apply, to explore and to be curious. They are not designed to sit still and pay attention to the same stimuli for long periods – this induces a state of trance, as most hypnotists know. Our understanding of learning can best be summarized by Sumara and Davis (1997, p. 107) as: ‘… a process of organizing and reorganizing one’s own subjective world of experience, involving the simultaneous revision, reorganization and reinterpretation of past, present and projected actions and conceptions’. Learning results in a whole new set of questions to ask, based on their new understanding, not only different from their colleagues but also outside the curriculum, if not well beyond it.

These new questions provide a motivation to learn. Perhaps the example below will illustrate what is meant by this. Until 1697 all known swans were white. Nobody had seen a black swan, so in English poetry the idea of a black swan represented the impossible. In that fateful year Willem de Vlamingh, a Dutch explorer, discovered black swans in what was later to become Western Australia. Suddenly, the whole idea of swans changed, as did the metaphor for impossibility. The change eventually led Nassim Taleb in 2004 to write about black swan events.

These are unpredictable things that happen, good and bad, that have profound effects on the world. They are things we often fail to plan for and, in fact, we cannot prepare for, except by building resilience in people and in organizations. Taleb’s novel conceptualization of the black swan leads to a complete rethinking of what we mean by strategic planning by focusing on building capacity for dealing with uncertainty.

Heutagogy also draws on the notion of capability (e.g. Stephenson, 1996; Stephenson and Weil, 1992) by distinguishing between the acquisition of knowledge and skills or competencies and the deeper cognitive processes described above. Capability involves using competencies in new contexts and challenging situations. It is about the unknown and the future, rather than the routine. In demonstrating capability the person is making a host of new neuronal connections, creating new hypotheses and testing them mentally and physically, in understanding the best way to proceed.

At the same time, capability requires the learner to have a high degree of self-efficacy in their ability to learn and access appropriate resources. Capable people also recognize the need to work with others to deal with new and changing circumstances.

In part 3, we’ll look at the kinds of competencies involved in this kind of approach.

Learning Beyond The Curriculum; adapted image attribution flickr user danzen

The post Learning Beyond The Curriculum appeared first on TeachThought.

Are You Prepared For The Future Of Social Learning?

vfs-social-learning-1-fiAre You Prepared For The Future Of Social Learning?

by Krish Kupathil, Mobiliya

R = e –t/s where R is retention, T is time and S is strength. A formula detailing a chemical reaction, or the new math behind a social media outreach strategy? Actually, an expression of the ability to remember, discovered by the German psychologist Herman Ebbinghaus. Known as the famous Forgetting Curve, it hypothesized the decline of memory retention over time. In fact we now know that 50 percent of formal learning is forgotten within the first hour.

With this statistic in mind, it is surprising that our formal education system –our schools, colleges and universities— has primarily relied on conventional learning methods to deliver information. Until even a few decades ago, schools, colleges and even professional organizations saw learning happening through structured modules, courses and programs delivered by the ‘head’ of the class, typically a teacher or trainer, to a group of passive listeners.

Even with the growth of digital platforms such as online programs, the basic structure of learning remained the same; automation and technology simply enhanced the delivery methods. But now with the ascent of social media, not only has the delivery model markedly changed, but also the construction and development of content. Social platforms have completely redefined the way people create, search and consume content. Not surprisingly, the social revolution has made an impact on learning and development, setting the stage for social learning; a term devised by Albert Bandura in 1977. The social learning model has been reinvented and has emerged as the single most powerful factor revolutionizing modern education.

Social Learning – A Way of Life

With the Internet exploding with information resources and tools for learning, teachers can be facilitators of information with a greater emphasis on explanation and critical thinking as opposed to the dissemination source. Formal learning systems have in some cases been slower to adopt this model, rightfully concerned with accuracy of material and consistency; yet with ever increasing numbers of individuals accessing information in learning environments, the necessity of these formal systems to adopt technological change is very clear.

Where once a rote chapter on the Renaissance movement devolved into students losing interest and ultimately forgetting the lesson, now augmented reality technology enables learners to have an immersive “experience” of the Renaissance era. For the current generation of “digital natives” who start using tablets and smartphones even before they can talk, social learning is not an alternative but an inherent way of life. The challenge becomes how to ingrain the knowledge of the teacher, their skills and efficacy in explanation into the almost infinite expanse of knowledge that students get through shared Facebook posts, Twitter links, YouTube videos, Quora threads, or any number of constantly emerging and growing online resources.

Considered from this angle the challenge is really an opportunity to merge the ubiquity and deep capacity of information present in these platforms with the inspiration and commitment of teachers to students constantly improving and dedicated to advanced learning. Social learning is already proving to be not just an alternative system, but the growing norm and tool that will shape the education of tomorrow.

Is your Learning Management System (“LMS”) Social Learning Friendly?

Due to the multiple access points of information, students need less direction to find a particular piece of knowledge. What students do need is a secure and structured environment where they can use the resources of their choice (including text, audio and/or video) to discuss, communicate and collaborate. Learning can then be more engaging and interactive. While learning platforms have long been integral to school and college education, in some cases existing tools and systems have not kept pace with the rapidity of technological and innovative change to deliver a truly collaborative learning experience. In many cases Learning Management Systems (LMS) are either restricted to automating formal learning, or only add in a few social media tools to round off their delivery model.

An LMS is fundamentally a framework by which students and teachers can integrate their learning on a unified system. Because of the diversity of source material, educators and students need a secure platform that allows them to work on shared documents, make and exchange notes, start live chats and conference calls, or start a discussion thread with fellow students. The differentiators from a traditional approach include flexibility, reach, scope and scale that allows students and instructors the freedom to engage and explore material on their terms. With the vast amount of content available, coupled with the diversity of platform delivery options, the importance of a structured system to provide seamless integration offers a knowledge advantage.

This single-point secure encrypted environment prevents any possibility of the content getting leaked or any copyright violations. Additionally, from a learning perspective, benefits to the students and teacher include: multiple device access, remote learning, testing and assessment fluidity and comprehension advancement leading to higher-level offerings.

Technology is increasingly embedded in the work/life equation, now educators and learners need a smart platform, commensurate with intelligent technology, which saves every interaction with the context of the topic, section, notes and other reference materials along with a date and time stamp, creating a robust content archive, allowing for access at any time.

Tools like Skype, Google Drive, OneNote and OneDrive are some of the most widely used channels to share content, communicate and work together. Integrating these cloud technologies with learning management systems is critical for making a digital education platform truly social, interactive and value-driven. For students and teachers relying on multiple tools to share and access different forms of content or different channels, difficulties and complexities arise that can burden the learning process. A unified interface that drives all activities is far superior for making social learning integral to digital education.

Content gamification is yet another vital aspect of social learning. As educators, it is important to have a LMS that goes beyond the standard leader boards, point, or level system. Number games, word puzzles, and even inter-team quiz contests after the end of every chapter or section can truly get the ball rolling, leading to more learners participating, working in groups and getting more engaged.

Students of today are the workforce of tomorrow. Future workplaces are all about using modern tools of communication and collaboration to work in virtual teams spread across locations. Thus, social learning at an early age is now essential to create a future-ready skilled workforce that is adept at self-organized learning, knowledge sharing and working seamlessly with teams.

Krish Kupathil is the founder and CEO of Mobiliya, a world leader in enterprise mobility and education products. Krish has led the company to build innovative products in enterprise and military level security, collaboration and communication for the fast growing BYOD model in enterprises and enterprise device management; Are You Prepared For The Future Of Social Learning? adapted image attribution flickr user vancouverfilmschool

The post Are You Prepared For The Future Of Social Learning? appeared first on TeachThought.

Improving Your Teaching Through Student Feedback

Every Classroom Matters episode 183


student feedback dean shareski (1)

How can we improve our lessons? When do we know what works and what doesn’t? In today’s show, Dean Shareski talks candidly about student feedback and the role of self-reflection in teaching. Improve the craft of teaching by incorporating his suggestions in your classroom routines. Become intentional and level up a little every day.

Important Takeaways

  • How student reflections can help teachers improve.
  • A scary thing Dean found his college students weren’t comfortable doing.
  • The two-word question that made Dean a better teacher.
  • The problem with rubrics.
  • Vicki’s “a-ha” moment about student feedback from Dean’s inspiration.

Dean Shareski’s honest talk about grades, assessment, and student feedback apply to every level of teaching. Self-reflection is an important part of teaching. Dean helps us understand how we can reflect and how our students can help.

Today’s Sponsor Lesley University has an impressive line-up of online programs specifically designed for busy teachers. If you’re interested in strengthening your professional training, your resume or your career options, you’ll want to take a look at what Lesley has to offer. Lesley’s programs include: creative learning environments, experienced faculty, small classes, and the kind of supportive online community that we all value and want. 

Educator Resources and Links from the Show

Take a moment to check out Lesley’s programs for teachers by going to Online.Lesley.edu/BamRadio

Check Out Lesley University’s Online Programs

Great quotes from the show you can share…

student feedback - we need relationships with students

Dean Shareski joy - student feedback

Education is an isolated profession. Dean Shareski

Do we see joy as we look on student faces in our classroom?

We can always use student feedback. If we think we've arrived, we really have a long way to go. Those teachers who don't think they need student feedback often need it the most.

We can always use student feedback. If we think we’ve arrived, we have a long way to go. Those teachers who don’t think they need student feedback often need it the most.

Improve your teaching with student feedback.

Improve your teaching with student feedback.

You can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes or elsewhere, get the RSS feed, or listen via the media player above.button-itunes

Join the Every Classroom Matters Awesome Educators Network on Facebook

The post Improving Your Teaching Through Student Feedback appeared first on Cool Cat Teacher Blog by Vicki Davis @coolcatteacher helping educators be excellent every day. Meow!

looking for a Glasgow Maths Tutor

At Scholar Tutoring, we have a professional team of teacher that are ready to provide the following services to Glasgow, residents.

One to One Tutoring

Revision courses

Maths is one of those subjects that we know we need, if for no other reason than all jobs and subjects need you to have a minimum grade in the subject. But how does this often theoretical subject translate into the real world.

From architecture to science, medicine to being a zoo keeper, maths is a subject we use all the time, and one that we, our clients, bosses and the public need to know that we can use those skills correctly. Designing cars launching space crafts, surveying archaeology sites and measuring ingredients for cakes. These all require a strong foundation in maths.
The subject however is built some what like a wall. Without strong foundations here is no base on which to build further knowledge. Just a few missing steps means the next layer of learning is difficult. Tutoring allows your child to fill in the missing gaps, or extend their knowledge to get a great final grade.
Often maths students fail because they are afraid in the rather public area of a class room in front of their friends and peers to ask the teacher to go over the basic topic that they may have not studied for some time, or failed to grasp first time round. Unable to grasp the basic tasks, they become easily bored and distracted leading to them falling further behind, and possibly becoming disruptive. As tutors we know that there is no such thing as s stupid question and we can work to help the students put the missing bricks in their personal wall and get them reengaged with class room learning. Contact us now to book your child a place with a dedicated tutor.

Click here to see some of the subjects that we offer in Glasgow

Source Here: looking for a Glasgow Maths Tutor

looking for a Glasgow Maths Tutor

At Scholar Tutoring, we have a professional team of teacher that are ready to provide the following services to Glasgow, residents.

One to One Tutoring

Revision courses

Maths is one of those subjects that we know we need, if for no other reason than all jobs and subjects need you to have a minimum grade in the subject. But how does this often theoretical subject translate into the real world.

From architecture to science, medicine to being a zoo keeper, maths is a subject we use all the time, and one that we, our clients, bosses and the public need to know that we can use those skills correctly. Designing cars launching space crafts, surveying archaeology sites and measuring ingredients for cakes. These all require a strong foundation in maths.
The subject however is built some what like a wall. Without strong foundations here is no base on which to build further knowledge. Just a few missing steps means the next layer of learning is difficult. Tutoring allows your child to fill in the missing gaps, or extend their knowledge to get a great final grade.
Often maths students fail because they are afraid in the rather public area of a class room in front of their friends and peers to ask the teacher to go over the basic topic that they may have not studied for some time, or failed to grasp first time round. Unable to grasp the basic tasks, they become easily bored and distracted leading to them falling further behind, and possibly becoming disruptive. As tutors we know that there is no such thing as s stupid question and we can work to help the students put the missing bricks in their personal wall and get them reengaged with class room learning. Contact us now to book your child a place with a dedicated tutor.

Click here to see some of the subjects that we offer in Glasgow

See More Here: looking for a Glasgow Maths Tutor